2017-10-06 / Life

Students earn welding certification

BY DEREK MOY
DISPATCH RECORD


From left, Dylan Moss, Clayton Wright, Bedford Hale Jr., Ethan Oakes, Zack Hamilton, Jimmy Wesson and Solomon Coates completed the American Welding Society’s Safety in Welding, Cutting and Allied Processes certification. 
COURTESY PHOTO From left, Dylan Moss, Clayton Wright, Bedford Hale Jr., Ethan Oakes, Zack Hamilton, Jimmy Wesson and Solomon Coates completed the American Welding Society’s Safety in Welding, Cutting and Allied Processes certification. COURTESY PHOTO Lampasas High School students enrolled in welding Career and Technical Education courses received their first certifications, teacher Ricky Prescott said.

The ANSI Z49.1 Fitness for Duty torch certification demonstrates students can weld, cut and participate in allied processes safely.

“What they can do is the setup and use of the cutting torch on both acetylene and propane,” Prescott said. “We covered the Victor torch book. They did a code test, and then they have to perform cutting torch responsibilities.”

So far, the welding course has taught from a book on the different types of torches used in welding, codes and cutting metal.


Ricky Prescott, left, earned his visual welding inspector certification, allowing him to inspect the students’ work in the welding courses he teaches. Prescott is given his certification by Career and Technical Education Director Randy Brady. 
COURTESY PHOTO Ricky Prescott, left, earned his visual welding inspector certification, allowing him to inspect the students’ work in the welding courses he teaches. Prescott is given his certification by Career and Technical Education Director Randy Brady. COURTESY PHOTO “[The students] love it,” Prescott said. “They’re just eating it up.”

The students will receive a card with their unique number from the American Welding Society. Throughout the year, all of their earned certifications will be attached to their number so potential employers can look up their certifications on demand, Prescott said.

“It proves that the kids have done it before, and then they have to test at the job site,” Prescott said. “Once they test at the job site and prove they can do it, they’ve got the job.”

Senior Dylan Moss said he plans to go to college, but getting a job in welding could help generate income. As a senior, Dylan can earn up to 15 certifications by the end of the year.

Employers such as Fort Hood and manufacturing plants will accept the certifications, as they are under an entrenched standard from the American Welding Society.

“It’s great the school offers this,” Dylan said. “Some kids aren’t going to be able to have these opportunities outside school, so it gives them an opportunity to do it for free – relatively free.”

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