2017-01-10 / Front Page

Stock show to begin Thursday

Youth event grows, with increase in entrants plus improvements to facilities
BY JEFF LOWE
DISPATCH RECORD


During freezing weather on Saturday morning, Nyla Long, left, Paige Rutland, center, and Alexis Cravens sweep an entrance to the Lampasas County Youth Livestock Center. Students gathered to clean up the show barn in preparation for this week’s Lampasas County Youth Livestock Show. 
JEFF LOWE | DISPATCH RECORD During freezing weather on Saturday morning, Nyla Long, left, Paige Rutland, center, and Alexis Cravens sweep an entrance to the Lampasas County Youth Livestock Center. Students gathered to clean up the show barn in preparation for this week’s Lampasas County Youth Livestock Show. JEFF LOWE | DISPATCH RECORD The 80th Annual Lampasas County Youth Livestock Show is just days away, with a full lineup of events scheduled.

Turnout this year is slightly higher than in the past.

As of Thursday, this year's show had 167 exhibitors signed up for all categories and 505 total entries, Lampasas County Livestock Association Treasurer Susan Hines said. Last year, 152 exhibitors had a total of 499 entries, Mrs. Hines said.

The number of young exhibitors showing rabbits is especially high, said Shane Hall, president of the county livestock association.

More than 90 rabbits were entered as of early last week, according to Lampasas FFA adviser Dr. Steve Forsythe.


Traxton Holloman, a junior FFA member, blow dries his market steer in preparation for the upcoming Lampasas County Youth Livestock Show. 
DR. STEVE FORSYTHE | COURTESY PHOTO Traxton Holloman, a junior FFA member, blow dries his market steer in preparation for the upcoming Lampasas County Youth Livestock Show. DR. STEVE FORSYTHE | COURTESY PHOTO Hall believes one reason for the increase in rabbit showing is that exhibitors can raise the small animals without having to own or have access to large property.

Several improvements have been made to the show barn facilities just north of town at the intersection of U.S. highways 183 and 281.

Additional parking has been added near the back of the barn, and new handicapped-parking spots are available near the front. Other parking lot improvements include added lighting.

Spray-foam insulation, which later was painted, was added inside the barn.

White sheetmetal has been added to two walls in the show ring to cover up the metal frame of the building, Hall said.

There also are new sheep and goat pens, new plumbing fixtures in the cattle area and new rear access for the swine barn. Plus, awnings have been placed over the doors and cook shack area.

Kelli Isom, secretary of the county livestock association, said facility improvements were made possible by money raised from the annual reverse raffle, as well as by a grant from the Lower Colorado River Authority.

The annual show “is very important for our county and our kids because we have a rich agricultural heritage …,” Forsythe said. “I think it’s important for us to recognize and to celebrate our agricultural heritage.”

Forsythe emphasized the broad range of shows offered, including the Food Fair and Ag Mechanics competition.

Organizers are seeking participants for the pee wee division of the Lampasas County Food Fair. Divisions are available for 4- and 5-year-olds as well as for 6- through 8-year-olds.

This year, pre-entry is not required for the pee wee Food Fair. Check-in is Thursday from noon to 1 p.m. Judging will follow shortly afterward.

For more information, contact Karen DeZarn in the Lampasas County Extension Office at 512-556- 8271.

Categories for the Food Fair include cakes, pies, decorated cupcakes, cookies, candies, breads, appetizers/snacks, salsas/sauces, beef and Exhibitor’s Species Jackpot.

Exhibitors may enter a main dish featuring the species of livestock they show.

The Food Fair is an important reminder of agriculture’s most important contribution to mankind.

“If you eat, you’re involved in agriculture,” Forsythe said.

Students have many different interests, but Forsythe believes the county show offers “something for everybody.”

The Ag Mechanics Show, in which he is closely involved, “allows kids to create and build something,” Forsythe said.

Thirty-nine ag mechanics entries will be included in the show if they are completed by the deadline, Forsythe said.

Divisions for the Ag Mechanics Show include livestock equipment, farm and ranch home/ indoor, farm and ranch recreation/outdoor, trailers, farm machinery and woodwork projects.

Projects will be judged based on workmanship, sound design and balance, degree of difficulty, practical utility and originality of design.

This week’s youth event is “an opportunity for the people in the community to come out and celebrate their rural roots …,” Forsythe said. “They need to stop long enough to support the kids that have worked hard … also recognize where their food comes from.”

Thousands of dollars in scholarships and premium sale revenue can help exhibitors achieve their academic and agricultural pursuits.

Last year, $21,700 in scholarships were awarded from the livestock association and the Ladies’ Auxiliary, Kelli Isom said.

Since the first Lampasas County livestock show decades ago, “we’ve come a long way,” Forsythe said. Longtime residents of the county “can remember when it was setting up a bunch of panels and having the show on the square.”

With the recent upgrades to the show barn and mild temperatures forecast for this weekend, attendees may avoid the cold weather often associated with the county show.

An overview of the schedule follows.

WEDNESDAY

Ag mechanics projects must be moved into the show barn by 7 p.m.

THURSDAY

7 a.m. Rabbit check-in. Rabbit show to follow.

• 4 Class Division

• 6 Class Division

Showmanship ( junior, intermediate, senior, pee wee)

Noon-1 p.m. Food Fair check-in will begin after the rabbit show, but not before noon.

1 p.m. Food Fair judging begins.

4-6 p.m. Swine weigh-in/ check-in.

5 p.m. Food Fair awards in the show ring.

5-6:30 p.m. Market lambs begin to weigh and classify, followed by meat goats.

5:30 p.m. Exhibitor meeting.

6 p.m. Broiler check-in starts, with show to follow. Pullets show first, followed by cockerel show.

6 p.m. Swine check-in closes.

7 p.m. Steers begin to weigh and classify.

Heifer registration papers will be checked following the steers.

All animals must be in place by 7 p.m.

FRIDAY

8 a.m. Ag Mechanics Show begins.

9 a.m. Swine show begins (registered, followed by crossbred)

• Breeding swine show

• Market swine show

• Swine showmanship

• Lee Vann Sportsmanship Award

• Britt Hopson Memorial Award

• Pee Wee Showmanship

Noon Ag mechanics awards announced in show ring.

Approx. 1 p.m Market lamb show will begin after completion of the swine show, but not before 1 p.m.

Market lambs will be shown in breed order: Southdown, Fine Wool, Fine Wool Cross, Medium Wool, Hair Sheep.

Lightweight will be shown first.

Market lamb showmanship will follow ( junior, intermediate, then senior).

T.R. Carson Award

Goat show will start after

completion of the lamb show. Breeding goats will be exhibited, followed by breeding goat showmanship ( junior, intermediate, then senior). Market goats will follow, then market goat showmanship will be presented ( junior, intermediate, then senior).

• Klose Sportsmanship Award

• Pee Wee Showmanship (lamb and goat showmanship together)

At the conclusion of the goat show, all tables, equipment and tack must be cleared out of the sheep and goat aisles to prepare for cattle show.

SATURDAY

8 a.m. Heifer show in breed order: American, British, Exotic. Calves, then yearlings.

Steer show will follow heifer show in the same breed order, lightweight shown first.

Beef Cattle Showmanship ( junior, intermediate, then senior).

Colorado River Cattle Women’s First-Year Showman Award

Marvin Vann Sportsmanship Award

Buddy Perry Award

3:30 p.m. Exhibitors report to show barn kitchen area for Buyers’ Dinner to eat, then serve. All exhibitors are asked to report in a white shirt and help serve at the Buyers’ Dinner.

5 p.m. Buyers’ Appreciation Dinner.

6:30 p.m. Premium Sale.

Photos of sale animals will be taken after the last class the exhibitor shows in and the sale is confirmed.

SUNDAY

8 a.m. All animals and projects must be out of the barn.

9 a.m. Clean-up of show barn. All exhibitors are required to participate and sign in with their advisers.

2016-2017 LAMPASAS COUNTY LIVESTOCK ASSOCIATION OFFICERS

President Shane Hall

Vice President Karl Oestreich

Secretary Kelli Isom

Treasurer Susan Hines

2016-2017 LCYLA BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Poultry – Karl Oestreich and Chad Hopson

Swine – Bobby Gene Carroll and Mark Rainwater

Ag Mechanics – Xavier Alaniz and Bobby Gene Carroll

Sheep – Mark Rainwater and Xavier Alaniz

Food Fair – Christine Byrd, Susan Hines and Kelli Isom

Goats – David Parker and Carlos Garcia

Rabbits – Gennifer Brister and Christine Byrd

Heifers – Thad Maples and Karl Oestreich

Steers – Daryl Raub and Doug Moresco

Building – Carlos Garcia, Chad Hopson and Shane Hall

Junior Livestock Board – Gennifer Brister

SHOW JUDGES

Chickens – Dennis Ellebracht

Rabbits – Michael Franke

Sheep and Goats – Corey Taylor

Swine – Riggen Barham

Steers and Heifers – Paul Maulsby

Ag Mechanics – James Hill, Clark Campbell and Jamie Sanderford

Food Fair – Gretchen Sanders, Blanco County Food & Consumer Science agent; Linda Wells, Burnet County Food & Consumer Science agent; Jackie McLaughlin, Bell County Food & Consumer Science agent

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